Monday, 05 May 2014 00:00

8 Startups In Asia to Watch Out For

 

1. Giift | Singapore

Singapore startup Giift wants to shake things up with an online platform that supercharges how loyalty programs are done through the efficiency that the internet brings. It has a classic two-sided platform – on one side, merchants have the ability to upload, manage, and measure their loyalty programs in exchange for monthly subscription and referral fees of between four to six percent. On the consumer side of things, users can track the amount of loyalty points they have, make redemptions using the app, and exchange points from one program to another


Vietnam’s Dropbox is back from the dead with new investment, partners with telco Viettel

In October last year, Asian Tech website - Tech In Asia reported that Kleii, Vietnam’s equivalent of Dropbox, was in a coma.

The service accumulated more than one million users, but its business model was bleeding money. Nguyen Tuan Son, the CEO of Kleii, told the media website that he was re-evaluating the service and working on new ways to release it.

Now that day has come. Today, Kleii’s blog announces three major steps on its path back to being a consumer and business cloud platform. They are: Kleii has received another round of undisclosed funding from TheFarm VC.

Published in Deals & Funding

Innovation in Vietnam can come from the most interesting places. There’s a startup with motorbike theft prevention hardware. There’s one that crowdsources for tours. There’s another that focuses totally on ecommerce logistics. And don’t get me started on Flappy Bird. The list goes on. This week, Topica, one of Vietnam’s most successful online learning platforms, is doing something a bit different with English education. The company, which was founded in 2008, already offers certification online, coordinates with colleges to offer online learning support, and also runs the Founder’s Institute annual incubator program. Now it’s experimenting with using Google Glass to teach students English. The program is called TopMito. As this video shows, Google Glass is being used to allow a teacher that sits at home to coach students that go to a local coffee shop in Hanoi, Vietnam. The coffee shop is working in coordination with Topica because it has foreign expat waiters who can interact with the students in English, allowing the students to use English in a practical way.


How did a chain-smoking geek from Hanoi design the viral hit Flappy Bird - and why did he walk away?

Last April, Dong Nguyen, a quiet 28-year-old who lived with his parents in Hanoi, Vietnam, and had a day job programming location devices for taxis, spent a holiday weekend making a mobile game. He wanted it to be simple but challenging, in the spirit of the Nintendo games he grew up playing. The object was to fly a bug-eyed, big-lipped, bloated bird between a series of green vertical pipes. The quicker a player tapped the screen, the higher the bird would flap. He called it Flappy Bird.
The game went live on the iOS App Store on May 24th. Instead of charging for Flappy Bird, Nguyen made it available for free, and hoped to get a few hundred dollars a month from in-game ads.

Published in Features