Sunday, 13 April 2014 00:00

Where Is The Next Silicon Valley?

It seems as though most every place that isn't actually Silicon Valley lays some claim to being the next Silicon Valley. Fair enough: Tech companies are the future, and it doesn't seem to be getting any harder to raise money to run new ones. Venture capital firms passed out more money at the beginning of this year than they have at any time since 2001, according to data released April 10, 2014 by investment researcher CB Insights. The CB data show that companies raised just under $10 billion in 880 separate deals over the first three months of this year.

Published in Research & Trends


The world’s eyes are shifting toward India as the next big market to watch, especially for those of us who keep tabs on the global tech scene. It was inevitable, then, that people would start comparing startup ecosystems of the archetypal United States and this fast-emerging powerhouse. Almost like a right of passage, every major startup scene in the world gets stacked up against Silicon Valley as a bellwether for how far it’s come and how far it has yet to go. Whether a direct comparison ultimately benefits India or not is debatable, as many would argue India shouldn’t model its startup ecosystem after Silicon Valley, but it’s still interesting to see the contrast solely based on statistical evidence. That’s what TiE, a group of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and executives with roots in the Indus region, has done with its latest infographic. TiE’s graphic compares four major startup hubs in India with their theoretical counterparts in the US; Bangalore versus Silicon Valley, New Delhi versus New York City, etc. Each comparison shows the cities’ 2013 population, number of startups, amount of investment capital, number of IPOs, and average valuation per startup.

Published in Research & Trends


Execs Will Talk Strategy at Ad Age Digital Conference

The world's largest food and beverage company has joined the ranks of marketers establishing a presence in Silicon Valley.
Nestle, which is headquartered in Switzerland, has been quietly operating its "innovation outpost" in the Bay Area for about a year. But the company has only recently begun to talk publicly about the program, which is designed to get the marketer closer to startups. Executives plan to share more details at the upcoming Ad Age Digital Conference, held April 1-2 in New York City.

Published in News


Microsoft Founder Bill Gates doesn’t worry that Silicon Valley is the home of billion-dollar texting apps and farming games. “Innovation in California is at its absolute peak right now. Sure, half of the companies are silly, and you know two-thirds of them are going to go bankrupt, but the dozen or so ideas that emerge out of that are going to be really important,” Gates told Rolling Stone, in a wide-ranging interview on government surveillance, financial inequality, immigration reform, and the cultural backlash against Silicon Valley.

Published in Features

Polarion Software Inc., an enterprise-scale browser-based application lifecycle management provider, has raised $10 million in Series A funding from Siemens Venture Capital.
The investment, which is the San Francisco-based startup’s first outside funding, enables it to expand globally. The company did not disclose specifics and has yet to respond to an email inquiry seeking more information.
Polarion’s ALM solution allows for traceability and transparency, and supports all software and product development processes in one platform.

Published in Deals & Funding

Li Ka-Shing who is ranked as Asia’s wealthiest man according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, with a net worth of $28.8 billion, was recently photographed scrambling artificial eggs. For a man with that much money you may indeed be asking yourself why, but these eggs have been produced by a company called Hamton Creek, a Silicon valley startup. The CEO in the photo pictured with Li Ka-Shing is Josh Tetrick who has just received US$ 23 million in a round of investment from Li. The company is now planning a major expansion into the Asian market. The company aims to reduce costs significantly in the egg market by introducung the lower cost substitute. The interesting thing about this deal is not just the nature of the business but the growing trend in which Silicon Valley start ups are now going over to Asia to seek new funding and tap wider markets. This trend happened over the last 10 years in which startups from the valley targeted Europe and European investment.

Published in Deals & Funding